10/9/17

9 of Montana’s Most Haunted Places

Searching for ghosts in Montana? You won’t have to look far. From a former brothel to a lonely hiking trail, here are nine places to find spirits in Big Sky Country.

Dumas Brothel – Butte

For nearly 100 years, the women of the Dumas Brothel served Butte’s hard-working miners. Though the bordello closed its doors in 1982, the property’s current owners believe at least a few working women remain. Eerie events include falling objects, disembodied voices, and beds that shake. A number of paranormal investigation teams have visited Dumas and reported strange things like lost time and mysterious scratches.

Bear Canyon Campground – Bozeman

Legend has it a little girl in a white dress haunts this scenic campground and surrounding trails. But the child is no harmless spirit. She reportedly tries to lure women deep into the woods and away from others. What the ghost girl wants with the women is anyone’s guess, but so far, no one appears to have been led astray.

Moss Mansion – Billings

Built in 1903, the historic Moss Mansion was once home to the illustrious Moss family. Legend has it they’re still there. The youngest Moss daughter succumbed to diphtheria in the home and now reportedly roams the hallways. Strange activity at the mansion includes flickering lights, slamming doors, and footsteps in empty rooms.

Bannack Ghost Town

Many spirits haunt this ghost town which is now a National Historic Landmark. One of the most famous is Dorothy, a woman who drowned in a nearby creek and now wanders the streets in a blue dress. A gang of executed outlaws also haunt the area. This photo at an old church appears to show a ghostly worshiper.

Little Bighorn Battlefield – Crow Agency

In 1876, the Battle of the Little Bighorn, or Custer’s Last Stand, raged in southeastern Montana, killing nearly 300 men and wounding dozens more. Now, ghosts reportedly walk the historic site. Legend has it soldiers and warriors creep across the battlefield at night when the moon is bright and visitors have gone home for the evening.

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10/1/17

The Ghosts of Yosemite National Park

yosemite_night

On October 1, 1890, Congress established Yosemite National Park. Exactly 127 years later, the park remains a major attraction, drawing more than 3.7 million visitors each year. Legend has it a few ghosts enjoy the site as well.

Ghost Wind

Yosemite is home to a number of breathtaking waterfalls, but the Miwok Indians believe a dark force stalks the men and women who come to marvel at the water’s beauty. Legend has it an evil wind known as Po-ho-no flows over the falls and lures unwary visitors to the edge. Once a person gets too close, the wind rushes over and sends the visitor hurtling over the falls.

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09/25/17

Ghosts of the Queen Mary

On May 27, 1936, the RMS Queen Mary set sail from Southampton, England, completing her maiden voyage in New York just a few days later. For the next three years, the ship was the height of luxury, transporting such notable passengers as Clark Cable, Bob Hope, Elizabeth Taylor, and Winston Churchill. Its elaborate facilities included two indoor swimming pools, beauty salons, libraries, tennis courts, and more. However, the luxurious amenities didn’t last.

In 1939, the Queen Mary was stripped down and began service as a World War II troop transport ship. For the next eight years, the ship hauled tens of thousands of servicemen across the sea, earning the nickname the Grey Ghost due to its color and speed. After the war ended, the Queen Mary was refitted for passenger travel and again served as a luxury liner until retiring from service in 1967.

Now permanently moored in Long Beach, California, the Queen Mary serves as a popular tourist attraction, complete with restaurants, a museum, and a hotel. Legend has it the historic ship is also haunted by the men, women, and children who died aboard.

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09/17/17

The Ghosts of Antietam

On September 17, 1862, the Battle of Antietam raged near the small town of Sharpsburg, Maryland. More than 23,000 men were killed, wounded, or missing in action during the four-hour battle, making Antietam the bloodiest single-day battle in American history. Given its tragic history, is it any wonder soldiers’ ghosts reportedly haunt the former battlefield?

Now, visitors at Antietam National Battlefield report smelling gun powder and seeing men in Confederate uniforms. At first, visitors assume they’re witnessing a reenactment. That is, until the uniformed men abruptly disappear. Other eerie events include blue balls of light that zip around and wink out and the faint sounds of drums beating in the distance.  An area known as “Bloody Lane” is particularly active.

Today, marks the 155th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. Do you think slain soldiers still haunt the area?