01/14/18

Ghost Photo: Lady of the River

What do you see when you look at this photo? Some believe the white figure is an ordinary person, but the man who took the picture isn’t so sure.

John Anderson snapped the photo along the banks of the River Trent in Burton, England. Anderson was fishing on a boat with his son when they noticed the silent figure.

“Whatever it was seemed to appear and disappear too quickly to be a person, so I don’t really know what it could have been,” Anderson told the BurtonMail. “I guess there are just some things out there that cannot be explained.”

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01/3/18

NYC’s Haunted Brooklyn Bridge

brooklyn bridge new york

On January 3, 1870, workers began construction on New York City’s Brooklyn Bridge. Today, nearly 150 years later, the bridge is a beloved landmark. But is it also haunted?

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12/10/17

Ghost Photo: Chloe the Killer Slave

Taken at the famous Myrtles Plantation in Louisiana, the photo above allegedly shows the ghost of a killer slave named Chloe. But is it real?

According to popular legend, a slave named Chloe baked an oleander-laced cake and poisoned three members of the prominent Woodruff family: Sarah, the lady of the plantation, and her two daughters, Mary and Cornelia. However, there’s just one problem. There’s no evidence a slave named Chloe ever existed, and the three victims didn’t die of poisoning. One daughter survived well into adulthood, while her sister and mother succumbed to yellow fever.

Like many famously haunted locations, the ghost origin story at the Myrtles Plantation is completely fasle. As for the photo, to me it appears someone took a historical image of a slave and placed into the background of this image.

What do you think?

11/28/17

Ghosts of the Cocoanut Grove Fire

On November 28, 1942, nearly 500 men and women perished in the Cocoanut Grove nightclub fire. Do their ghosts still haunt the site of the disaster 75 years later?

The Fire

In 1942, Cocoanut Grove was one of Boston’s most popular nightspots. On the night of the fire, more than 1,000 revelers were packed in a building rated for just 460 occupants. Though officials never identified a specific cause, the blaze likely started after a teenage busboy lit a match near one of the nightclub’s decorative palm fronds. In less than a minute, the fire spread across the nightclub’s fabric-covered ceiling, showering patrons with sparks and bits of burning fabric. The fireball then traveled up a narrow stairway to the main level and soon spread to the entire nightclub.

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